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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
under investigation. >>> hurricane sandy slammed into chrisfield, maryland, causing extensive damage. the state asked for help from fema. but the agency and the white house denied the request because not enough damage was done. >> reporter: when sandy flooded chrisfield, saving lives came first. >> is there water inside of your residence right now? >> yes, ma'am. >> i want to you try to stay calm. >> i have my grandson with me. >> reporter: taking stock of the damage came next. sitting just above the bay, many in the town took a big hit. >> my building took a big beating. worst i've seen. >> clearly chris field took it the hardest. a lot of people have been swamped out of their homes. >> reporter: after seeing the damage, the governor asked for federal disaster relief. money for repairing infrastructure was aproved, but now, federal help won'ting coming to homeowners and businesses because not enough damage was done. fema director craig fugate said at this point, it does not support a presidential disaster declaration because it does is not ba
of struggle for all of the hurricane sandy victims, all over this part of the country. folks are still looking for homes and apartments to live in until they're back on their feet. they're getting help every day, they know what suffering is like because they have been there themselves. tonig tonight's stephanie gosk has more on first responders in new orleans, making a difference up north. >> reporter: starting the day after a hurricane is a physical and emotional job. firefighters from new orleans who lived through hurricane katrina six years ago remember it well. >> i know what the people up here are going through, they're like how am i going to get this? >> reporter: they also remembered that the new york fire department was on the door steps helping just days after the levees broke. this captain's house flooded up to the roof. >> that was the biggest thing. >> reporter: now the firefighters from new orleans want to repay the favor. >> any country, any state. it is a connection between the fire department. and new york is like our brother city. >> reporter: places like belle harbor, long is
in emergency aid for superstorm sandy recovery. that request falls short of total damage estimates. governors from new york, new jersey and connecticut alone say they will need closer to 82 billion to fix their states. >>> we don't know their names, but a couple from a phoenix suburb has presented the second winning ticket from last month's massive powerball drawing. the couple came forward now because they were concerned about, guess what, the looming fiscal cliff. they will take home 192 million bucks before taxes, and the plan is to use the money to start a foundation and support their favorite charities. >>> more people out of work, and another recession. you want to know what's at the bottom of that fiscal cliff, well, there you have it. many say that what's going to happen if something isn't done soon, but guess what? alice rivlin has a plan. she's a senior fellow at the brookings institution and served as director of the white house office of management and budget, the omb, under president clinton. alice, good morning. >> good morning. >> nice to have you here on the show this morning.
by superstorm sandy. the request comes at a time when lawmakers are arguing how every dollar is spent. >>> our fourth story "outfront," an historic announcement. the supreme court decided today it will hear two constitutional challenges to same-sex marriage laws. if the court were to follow public opinion, the decision could come down in favor of gay and lesbian couples. recent polling shows 53% of americans think same-sex marriage should be legal. 46% say illegal. and on election day, voters in three states approved same-sex marriage. "outfront," mckay coppins, tim carney and maria cardona, cnn contributor and democratic strategist. this is kind of big news in all of this. tim, you saw the polls. now the supreme court will get involved in this. should this signal something to the republican party? should they say it's reached this level? >> polls are one thing. there's also the fact most states don't have gay marriage yet and most of those that do, it was not put in by the will of the people. i'm a marylander. our state did vote for gay marriage. most of them had to do with judges ruling. if
aid for states that were devastated by superstorm sandy. it may not pass in congress until next year because of the fiscal cliff situation. >>> and some electronic device bans could be lifted. in a letter to the faa, the agency called for greater use of portable devices on planes. i thought they affected navigation systems. but maybe that's not true. >>> and finally, a fish tale with a picture to prove it. a fisherman caught what is believed to be the biggest yellow fin tuna ever. landed on rod and reel, that is. 459 pounds. he fought the fish for two hours. the previous record, dan harris was reminded me, was 427 pounds this year. >> i take this very seriously, ron. >> a walking encyclopedia. >> he likes his sushi. >>> time for the weather and ginger zee. >> good morning, everybody. i want to start in the pacific northwest, where they've been waiting for snow at the ski resorts. and snowboarders happy, too. snoqualmie pass, they got it. they got well over six inches in a lot of spot. that same storm that drops that snow is moving through the northern plains. that's what will be resp
at the white house. the republican governor was here in washington to talk about hurricane sandy relief efforts, and now they're in danger of going over the fiscal cliff with the rest of the country at the end of the month. our national political correspondent jim acosta has been covering this story for us. what's the latest with chris christie in washington. >> reporter: this is some of the unintended consequences of the fiscal cliff. after a series of meetings with the president and house speaker john boehner, new jersey governor chris christie had little to say as he left washington, but as other senators we spoke to see it, the jersey shore may be running head on into the fiscal cliff. he visited the president at the white house, then he met with senators from his own state before slipping in to meet the speaker of the house. >> going home, guys. see you later. >> reporter: but then chris christie, a potential presidential candidate who is rarely at a loss for words, departed the nation's capital in near total silence. as it turns out, the new jersey governor's quest for money to rebuild th
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)